La Dolce Vita #3: Who needs Versailles when… (part 2)

Palazzo Vecchio, Florence

Palazzo Vecchio, the town hall of Florence, was given several names in accordance with the varying use of the palace during its long history. Michelangelo’s David also stood at the entrance until 1873, when it was moved to the Accademia Gallery. A replica now stands in its place. The Salone dei Cinquecento (Hall of the Five Hundred) is the largest and most important room in terms of artistic and historical value inside the palace. This impressive hall has a length of 54 meters, a width of 23 and a height of 18 meters. Paneled ceilings and large wall frescoes, golden decorations and imposing sculptures will leave you admiring in marvel. All the rooms are magnificently decorated by artists such as Michelangelo, Giorgio Vasari, Leonardo and Donatello.

Palazzo Doria Phamphilj, Rome

The Palazzo Doria Pamphilj is one of the largest and most magnificent palaces in the center of Rome. The seventeenth century palace is home to the Galleria Doria Pamphilj, a gallery with an exquisite collection of paintings and sculpture.

Palazzo Te, Mantua

One of the most beautiful villas in Italy and a masterpiece of the Mannerism palazzo Te was built by Giulio Romano between 1525 and 1535, as a suburban residence for Federico II Gonzaga. The Giant’s Room, covered in its entire surface by spectacular paintings, tells the story of the fall of the Giants from Olympus after their rebellion against Jupiter. The visual impact is so powerful that one feels as if everything is actually crashing down on them. The room has still got an interesting acoustics due to its shape, made on purpose to enhance the sound in it.

Farnese Palace of Caprarola

The Villa Farnese, also known as Villa Caprarola, is a mansion in the town of Caprarola, approximately 50 kilometres north-west of Rome. The palace, a massive Renaissance and Mannerist construction, is situated directly above the town of Caprarola and dominates its surroundings.

Medici Riccardi Palace, Florence

Medici Riccardi Palace is one the most important monuments in Florence, a prototype of Renaissance and Baroque architecture.

Palazzo Ducale, Mantua

The Ducal Palace Was the main residence of the Gonzaga family, lords, marquises and finally Dukes of the city. Under the Austrian domination with Maria Teresa of Austria it was called Royal Palace. The buildings are connected by corridors and galleries and are enriched by inner courts and wide gardens. The complex includes some 500 rooms and occupies an area of c. 34,000 m². It is most famous for the Camera degli Sposi (Wedding Room), a room frescoed with illusionistic paintings by Andrea Mantegna.

Royal Villa of Monza

The palace was originally built between 1777 and 1780, when Lombardy was part of Austrian Empire, for the Archduke Ferdinand of Austria. In 1861, when the new Kingdom of Italy was established, the building became a palace of the Italian Royal Family of Savoia.

Royal Palace, Genoa

Royal Palace, Palermo

The Palazzo dei Normanni (Palace of the Normans), is the oldest royal residence in Europe.

Quirinal Palace, Rome

Located on the Quirinal Hill, the highest of the seven hills of Rome, it has housed thirty Popes, four Kings of Italy and twelve presidents of the Italian Republic. The palace extends for an area of 110,500 square metres and is the 6th largest palace in the world in terms of area. By way of comparison, the White House complex in the United States is one-twentieth of its size.

Roma-Quirinale-dettaglio di un soffitto

Palazzo del Quirinale

Palazzo del Quirinale

For an unforgettable virtual visit, look here

Royal Castle of Racconigi

The Castle of Racconigi is a palace and landscape park in Racconigi, official residence of the Carignano line of the House of Savoy, and is one of the Residences of the Royal House of Savoy included by UNESCO in the World Heritage Sites list.

Find the other lists here

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One thought on “La Dolce Vita #3: Who needs Versailles when… (part 2)

  1. Pingback: La Dolce Vita #0: Index | Carta, forbici, gatto

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